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4 July 2016 at 7:29PM

Which Specialist is Right for You?

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Marie-Josée Paul
In: News

It's not always easy to make sense of all the different options when it comes time to see a specialist for a hearing problem, whether for us, for our parents or even our children. Here's a quick look at the main specialists dedicated to your hearing health!

 Otorhinolaryngologist (Ear, Nose and Throat Specialist)

This medical specialist treats ear, nose and throat illnesses, as well as those relating to the head and the neck. His role consists in diagnosing medical conditions and treating them with the required medical and surgical interventions. He also specializes in problems with balance and vertigo, and can perform different corrective surgeries relating to deafness.

 Audiologist

Audiologists prevent, diagnose and treat hearing disorders and impairments. They provide guidance and support to their patients by developing communication strategies and other hearing aid devices. They also cater to the needs of those living with tinnitus. Audiologists work hand in hand with hearing care professionals to solve problems relating to hearing loss and offer well-adapted solutions.

 Hearing Care Professional

Hearing care professionals work to correct hearing impairment. They sell, install, adjust and perform maintenance of hearing aids. Guidance and support are a vital parts of the services provided by hearing care professionals. They must take all the necessary means to ensure patients properly adjust to their hearing aids and become readapted to the world of sound. Hearing care professionals work closely with otorhinolaryngologists, audiologists and speech-language pathologist, if need be.

 Speech-Language Pathologist

Speech-language pathologists assess and provide treatment for various problems related to language, communication, speech, voice and swallowing. For instance, when treating patients suffering from severe hearing loss, speech-language pathologists work to develop, restore or maintain their patients' ability to communicate, and promote their independence in all areas of their lives.